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of these are entrepreneurs who are not seeking special government leaders. the big banks, the goldman sachs of the world were all internet government and the government itself is mandating the purchase of these credit defaults on its and other devices which ended up bringing down the economy. it's not procapitalist to support goldman sachs and the internment embrace of the department of the treasury. >> is supply-side economics is quick >> surprise side economics is true economics. i actually am quite excited to have mitt romney running for president because they & co. was one of the providers of the foundation of supply-side economics. they apply to business. they showed the most effective way for businesses to gain share -- market share to cut their prices. we will cut prices that their business market share because costs are out by about 20 to 30% with each doubling of total units that were sold. the cost in general, economies of scope and scale of learning is called a learning curve. this is really the foundation of supply-side economics. why when you cut taxes, which are just like a prize, you reduce co
government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. the principles we stand for, free enterprise and limited government is the only way to stabilize and grow our middle class which i hope every american can attain. >> how worried are you about the republican chances -- >> you mean from the voters' perspective. the demographic changes? i don't think any voter in america -- there are voters that are locked into one party or the other but the fastest growing group is people who vote for candidates and not parties and people understand the issues and hopes that they have and offer real and concrete policy situations and real role for government to play in addressing those angst yits they face. we are one election away to do it. we have to recognize what it is and concentrate on doing it. >> how much of a danger to republicans do you think is posed by the changing demographic? >> it's not a danger but i
think the federal government will be on each of the following issues. we read a list of these issues, we rotated those. this is how it basically stacks up. ensuring long-term future of entire programs such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get
russian government is making it a requirement for tankers that follow that route to use russian ice breakers. it's not only natural gas, the japanese are looking to other energy sources to replace nuclear power after last year's nuclear disaster. an exhibition featuring the latest using solar powered technology has begun near tokyo. about 200 companies are taking part from japan, china and germany and several other countries. demand is growing in japan has power companies are now required to purchase renewable energy. but japanese solar makers lag behind overseas competitors in terms of profitability. this is one of the exhibitors. the japanese company is displaying solar panels with the world's highest level of power efficiency. it's trying to make a profit by selling solar panels as well as the electricity it generates. sharp is exhibiting a new product which is a combination of window glass and a solar battery. although it can be used on homes and office windows, it can generate only half the power of a regular solar panel. >>> more people in japan are planning to travel during t
, and the government is fully committed to making that happen. >> [inaudible] pruitt. >> the prime minister obviously believes within the leveson report, there exists something that is bonkers. how would the prime minister give the views of his planning minister who has said tens of thousands of new homes will have to be built on greenfield sites. >> i think it is absolutely clear, yes, we should build on brownfield land, yes, we should try and deal with the problem of empty homes, but we do have to have a conversation about the need to build more flats and more houses, where we don't have the current situation we have where if you don't have the help of mom and dad, people are in their mid 30s. all credit to the planning minister for trying to fix this problem. on the issue of leveson, i actually think there's a wide degree of agreement about what a new regulatory system ought to look like. it's set out there in black and white in leveson. we need to challenge the press to introduce it and, if they don't, obviously, we have to take further action. >> with more men in work than ever before, with more
involved in government service for over 40 years, i count my time in the army intelligence. it is close to 50 penc. having worked in various areas in congress and the executive branch, doing what we do here is not easy. so often part of what you do with, the challenges thank you have to work together. you have to be able to work together. sometimes it is not that easy. when it came to the joint effort here, in the military itself, i feel we have developed joint news as a real strength of our military. they're not even close to the level of joyousness we have in this country. it is working. it is doing well. my biggest challenge is going to be how can we take this model to make sure we can develop similar approaches elsewhere between military and veterans' hospitals paying able to come together, at being able to operate as one incident having these huge backlogs because they're trying to move someone from the military into the veterans operation and it becomes a huge pain in the ass to get it done. if we can bring that together so we are operating as one with the ability to really respon
settlements. >> the german government comes under fire for the alleged plan to sell tanks to saudi arabia's authoritarian rulers. >> happy birthday, sms. it is the 20th anniversary of the text message. >> israeli ambassadors have been summoned to various european capitals to face criticism over israel's plans to build homes in the west bank. the u.s. also slammed the mood as -- move as "especially damaging." >> israel's prime minister remains especially defiant. they announce the plans to build homes on friday in response to the plan to upgrade palestine to a non-member state. in the israeli ambassador -- >> israeli ambassador daniel taub. paris and berlin called in israeli envoys to express their opposition. they say that israel is sending an negative message in the midst of national -- international peace efforts. >> israel is undermining competency -- confidence. >> israel says it will build 3000 settler homes in eastern jerusalem and the west bank. also plans to accelerate construction in the area known as e1. that would further isolate palestinians in east jerusalem from the rest of
>> according to a group of open government advocates, the obama administration's efforts and government transparency are mixed. the sunlight foundation held a forum on whether president obama lifted to his pledge to have the most open government in american history. this discussion is 90 minutes. >> good morning. welcome to the kayseri committee and transparency event on transparency in the obama presidency. i am daniel schuman with the sunlight foundation. welcome. there are many meanings of transparency. i'm not going to get into all of them today, but i'm sure there will be many different aspects. their widely divergent opinions on the successes of the obama administration and i hope to explore some of those today. president obama made a number of promises when he was running for president. a number are still available on change.gov. during the course of the administration, new issues came up. everything from campaign finance disclosure to dealing with the lawsuit and others on visitors logs. there's been a lot of changes during the course of the administration. what i
and money. i don't know how i'm supposed to live. >> reporter: the philippine government is trying to distribute goods and dispatch medical staff to the affected areas. but destroyed roads and bridges are hampering relief operations. gas stations have been damaged, and there's a shortage of fuel. mindanao was hit by another typhoon just a year ago, leaving 1,200 people dead. with another disaster so soon, people are questioning the government's preparedness. president beanything know aquino issued a wning a day before the typhoon struck and told people to be prepared. but it wasn't enough to prevent extensive damage. local people are worried and frustrated. charmaine deogracias, nhk world, new bataan, philippines. >>> authorities in thailand have charged the former prime minister in connection to the deaths of civilians during a military crackdown against anti-government protesters in 2010. the department of special investigation on thursday issued charges against abhisit and the former deputy prime minister. trial proceedings are expected to start as soon as mid-december. the char
and the rest of the new leadership are reportedly planning to overhaul the structure of government. government sources say the leaders plan to cut one in three ministries from 27 to 18. they're planning to do away with the railway ministry and transfer its function to the communications ministry. critics say poor oversight led to the crash last year of a high-speed train. 40 people were killed. and the former head of the railways ministry was dismissed in a bribery scandal. officials in the agriculture ministry will take over the responsibilities of the water resources ministry, and those in the culture ministry will take on the duties of three other departments. analysts say xi could be trying to reduce the powers of senior civil servants to diffuse public frustration, but history suggests it may not be easy. premier wen jiabao had a similar plan five years ago, but conservatives prevented him from carrying it out. >>> as the governments of japan and china feud over the senkaku islands, some japanese are caught in the middle. they were raised by chinese on the mainland after their japanese pa
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
is in the south and that population is also in the need of services. the government hasn't included both in the delivery of services as well as the governments of the country the people of the north and although we have implemented programs in the north unless there is a connection between the government and individuals, the programs are not going to have the effect of people feeling as though they are a part of society. and so, there was an effort planned over the last couple of years where the development partners in tandem with the government, the central government would deliver resources to the north again with a government out in the lead and with the donors supporting. unfortunately, the pace of that was too slow and not very effective. another point moving forward i think is that we do need to concentrate on decentralization and making a connection between the government services and the individual what the community level. >> to build further on the comments about the resource base within the mali clearly there are difficult choices for the government there that are involved in
in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet
of the burden of having to govern egypt. removing themselves from the political system is more in keeping with the history of the egypt armed forces since the 1967 defeat when they determined being a political army was not good for their organization and their ability to fight a war on the battlefield. >> when you look at the struggle, is it first of all essentially the islamist versus the secularist, and is it fair to say as everybody does the islamists have greater appeal, they're better organized, they're going to win this? >> i think it is, right now there are basically three groups here that are contending for the loyalties of the great undifferentiated mass of egyptian people. one group is the egyptians. the people you remember from tahrir square a couple years ago. the third group, the mubarak loyalists. during the revolution of 2011, it was the islamists and young revolution nar ees against the loyalists. now because they have been so heavy handed in the way they have governed the transitions it's now really the revolutionaries fighting them. it takes egypt significant step more t
relieved of the burden of having to govern egypt. removing themselves from the political system is more in keeping with the history of the egypt armed forces since the 1967 defeat when they determined being a political army was not good for their organization and their ability to fight a war on the battlefield. >> is the struggle the islamist versus the seculars and is it fair to say as everybody does while the islamists have greater appeal, they're going to win this. >> there are basically three groups here that are contending for the loyalties of the mass of egypt people. one group is the egyptians. the other is the muhbaric loyalists. it was the islamists and the young revolutionaries against the loyalists. now because they have been so heavy handed in the way they have governed the transitions it's now really the revolutionary finds themselves with these loyalists. they're big grievance is this institution. it takes egypt significant step more toward islamic policy. just a really quick example. article two has said in egypt since 1971 that the sharria is the main source of legislati
heroic status. >> what we're hearing is the language of martyrdom. an elected government brought down by those who oppose it. it is a sign of just how polarized it has become. at the heart of the crisis is the president and his recent decree, giving himself immunity from judicial scrutiny. use the powers to rush through the constitution and call a referendum. tonight, thousands of opposition activists gathered outside the presidential palace. in a senior reminiscent of what happened when the bark -- mobaric was toppled. here they have their heroes and those they call martyrs, with the same at the keys asian -- the same accusation, that the revolution has been hijacked. >> he has put himself above the law. he has done everything to bring down his legitimacy. >> so a country that has once united against the dictatorship is now divided about how best to replace it. >> the unrest in egypt to the civil war that shows no signs of stopping in syria. today hillary clinton said the president's departure would be key to any transition. as efforts continue, so, too, does the blood shed on the gr
governments, spending 42% of the gdp. and we want to make any effort to stop that? or are we discussing to say it has never stopped before? >> i think the earlier social security, not fully implemented. there was no medicare. it has been pretty stable since 1980. it goes up and down with the business cycle, but it is pretty stable. this is the division between the right and left. who will continue to fight about bigger government and smaller government. we will not do it by refusing to pay for the government we have, thinking the economy in the process. that would be a good start, as a backdrop. i want to touch on your question about corporate and individual taxes. the third piece is small businesses. we work out how develop a tax code that is good for competitiveness. you need to think about how those play into it. i think one of the things to keep hearing through messages with different groups of people is, while everybody is aware that the solution is going to take sacrifices from all sides, on spending, on revenues -- the confidence you get for putting the deal in place to actually has tre
of material to go on, much more than ever before. >> the ministers will seek to the government's support for the ban. one federal interior minister said they have a good case, but he admits there are risks. >> the danger is that these proceedings could give new life to a party that is clearly on the decline. >> next, germany's premiers must decide if they want to follow the recommendation. experts say the process to outlaw the npd could take years. >> ok. peter craven has more from our parliamentary studios. does this mean the npd party will be banned? >> it is difficult to say. i can say it is want to be a long and winding road. the people who support this ban are hoping that both government and parliament will rally around and support it, too. angela merkel is meeting here in berlin tomorrow with the chief ministers of germany, -- germany's 16 federal states to discuss, amongst other things, this precise issue. i can say that angela merkel -- it is a well-known fact -- she is cautious and cagey about this push for a ban. they remember how a bid to get a previous -- a previous bid to ge
losses were concealed to avoid a government bailout. the complaints were filed with u.s. regulators, including the securities and exchange commission. >> the three alleged deutsche bank miss valuable to $12 billion in losses during the years 2007 through 2009 at the height of the global financial crisis. deutsche bank says the accusations are wholly unfounded. work has started on a major natural gas pipeline that critics say will deepen europe's dependence on russian gas. president putin was on hand as they began digging for the south stream pipeline. >> to augment supplies already flowing into germany. europe already receives 40% of its natural gas from russia. german investment and technology will be playing a key role in the project. >> it is a victory for russian president vladimir putin. they looked on as the first segments were welded together in western siberia. it is three weeks since bulgaria gave the go-ahead for the project. the last transit country to do so. >> this project has the political support of all partner countries. all have signed the contracts and taken their
to continue to reduce demand. >> what role should the government play in the future -- your business is in transportation, too -- we are mired in conversations about the fiscal cliff. we are talking about long-term infrastructure, a long term energy plan. >> this is the perfect opportunity for the government to work together to achieve a common goal. there is plenty of times when our interest might not call last with the interest of either of the parties. this is the opportunity we have never had before. you could have consumer, business, and the government's all working together to take advantage of this huge resource. for us, it makes so much sense because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 a quilt when natural gas. from the government point of view, everybody is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. everyone talks about taxes and what is going to happen with the fiscal cliff. there has been $1500 gone to increase oil prices. you can get them that tax cut today if you invested in our report. everybody talks about entitlements. high oil prices make the social security tr
: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place for assad to go. s
's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the side of freedom and give the freedom fighters the weapons with which they could fight. it happened much too late. and people said, at least he's not using his air force to attack his own people and then he began to attack his own people from the air. now more than 40,000 killed. so when we see the government of assad weaponize chemical and biological agents and put them in bombs, we know this is a leader with no limits and unfortunately he follows his father who proved capable of using weapons against his
>>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." the governments that keep an eye on north korea say the reclusive nation is going ahead with its next long-range ballistic missile launch. south korean sources say crews in the north have apparently installed the first section of a three-stage missile at a launch facility. north korean authorities maintain they're only firing off a rocket to put a satellite into orbit. they made the announcement saturday. they say the launch will happen between december 10th and 22nd and that the rocket will head south. they held a similar launch in april that ended in failure. south korean government sources say they believe the missile's first-stage booster has been moved on to a launch pad at a facility in the northwestern part of the country. south korean officials discussed the planned launch with ambassadors from japan and three other countries. south korean foreign ministry officials met separately with envoys from japan, the united states, china, and russia, all members of the six-party talks on north korea's nuclear program. details of the mee
. the government didn't think it could distinguish between mortgage interest and other kinds of interest. less interest is deductible now. some of the things are left over from the early days of the tax code. there is no magic about allowing people to deduct mortgage interest and not the interest they pay on their credit cards. some of these things are hard to explain. host: does it incentivize home buying? guest: it does provide some if incentive for buying a home and is a large tax break and gives them an enormous benefits. it mostly provides an incentive for buying a bigger house. it seems to incentivize mcmansions. there is a fair question of whether that is something we should be spending that much money on. host: let's go to ohio, robert is a democrat. caller: yes, my question is this. a question/comment. i have seen all these outbreaks been giving out. supposedly they were created for an incentive for them to hire more people. they were given as four years and years. a majority of these companies did very little in hiring. they say they still need to do this. why should we continue givi
't a progress report because there's no progress to report. >> tax cuts? not government spending, not irresponsible entitlements. that gets a pass. it will be tax cuts. obama's premise that this country'country'scountry's firse fraudulent and he's fixing it, and they'll be etched in stone. tax cuts. >> the president has given the republicans flexibility to come up with a credible, specific plan. what they offered in return was an empty letter. >> when it comes to fiscal cliff that's threat nick our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> tax cuts is what caused the fall of the united states from super power status. >> this president just won a big election and you would think that he would want to lead. >> we've had the election. the president was clear in the campaign that he was advocating and fighting for the middle income tax cuts. >> tax cuts. the whole premise of tax cuts is going to be blamed for all of this economic mess. >> this is a moment of truth. the clock is ticking, christmas it coming, the goose is getting fat. in many homes acros
this to a c.e.o. in the crowd. so maybe david, you could take this. what role should the government play in the future of -- your business is transportation, too -- in the transportation business with this? look, we are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equi
in the government's effort to go after the rebels. i mean, we have seen babies and children, women, civilians tortured and killed day after day in syria. and now the thought that they might unleash chemical weapons on them is focusing new attention on what happened back in 1988 when saddam hussein did it. he used the same type of chemical weapons to kill kurds, thousands of them. again, back in '88. thousands of innocent died in the attack, more than 10,000 suffered horrific injuries, not to mention -- we'll talk about it, exactly what happened in '88, how it unfolded, how they handled it and what the death toll was. they said birds just started dropping out of the sky, sheep and goats -- that was the first sign -- started keeling over in the fields dead, and then came the human death toll. it happens quickly, and it is awful. and it is one of the reasons why our government is taking this so seriously, this possible threat. and preparation now of weapons like sarin gas. more on that coming up in just a bit. >>> also from washington right now, fox news has confirmed that the fbi is today inves
, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much stronger growth, it's hard to justify current valuations. >> both of you stick around because we'll talk about china in just a second. today we'll be out in tokyo, as well, to assess what options the bank of japan really has. policy will not be dictated by market opinion. we'll take stock of britain's progress towards deficit reduction, this ahead of the chancellor's autumn statement. senior fellow for international economics. will the numbers live up to the expectations. meanwhile, over in ghi narks the mainland's factories are crank out more goods at the fastest pace in month. >> chinese factories appear to be recovering.
a divided government. it is up to us to make this divided government work. we have to set aside partisan concerns. how to work together to prepare this economy to get people back on their feet? how do we get this sense of real security and upper mobility for all americans, especially those in need? they are the same. the old ways will not do. we need new thinking and renewed efforts from all americans. it is true that president obama won reelection. i congratulate him on his victory. on january 20, he will face a a fiscal economy and and i mess. you might say he will inherit these problems. [laughter] [applause] he his second term, i hope t will offer fresh ideas. failure will mean for more years of -- four more years we have work to do. -- four more years. we have work to do. serious solutions for serious reforms, we thank him for doing that. [applause] the election did not go our way. the republican party cannot make excuses. we cannot have the next four years on the sidelines. we need to apply our timeless principles to the challenges of the day. our party excels at representing that
of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yesterday's will maximize the dollars given to spend. also by putting our most capable forces forward as always her newest, most advanced equipment, to ensure we effectively operate with our allies in part or as across a wide range of operations as we worked together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep his opening remarks a little shorter than the last time so i can get your questions. i picked to finish up with a couple of thoughts. rebalances based on the strategy of collaboration and cooperation, not containment. the u
gets automatic tax increases from everybody, more government money from the private sector. he gets big cuts in the military, which he also wants. and if anything goes wrong, he blames the republicans. i don't think he cares. either way from his perspective he's a winner. if he was looking for a deal, he would be dealing. he's not dealing. he's campaigning. stuart: you say if we go over the cliff, he wins. if we go with his plan, he wins. no way he loses on this situation. liz: fiscal cliff diving at the 11th hour -- i hate the cliches, i'm tired of them but we will see an 11th hour deal on december 24th, christmas eve or new year's eve in the dead of night. i'm worried about that. a very bad deal no one will have read. stuart: i think there might be a deal at the very last minute in which the republicans say okay higher tax rates on people making more than a half million and we'll talk about spending cuts at some point in the future. david: i think there's a 50/50 chance there won't be a deal. stuart: that's why the dow industrials are doing nothing because nobody knows what's going to
government in the nation of mali, our ally. this may seem inconsequential to the average american, but it could have big implications for our security as well as that of our regional and global allies. because in the power vacuum that was created in that spring coup, al qaeda saw an opportunity and they stepped in. three different extremist groups all linked to or controlled by al qaeda in the islamic magra known as aqim now control an area the size of texas in the northern part of mali. they succeeded in fracturing a formerly stable democracy and contributing to broad security, political and humanitarian crises that i believe have grave implications for the region and for america's interests. to put it simply, mr. president, this matters. mali, a relatively strong democracy for more than two decades, is now embroiled in turmoil. the united states in partnership with the international community must show leadership in helping it rebuild its democracy and restore its territorial integrity by reclaiming it from terrorists. so thi this morninges as the chr of the african chair subcom
government? why would he be doing this? >> well, i think the professor reason is probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary or, on the 17th which is, widely reported in the paper, in the newspapers, but, you know, our assessment is that their desire to continue down this road is motivated by their desire to ensure that their capability, they are now a self-proclaimed nuclear state, their ability to be able to demonstrate to the world that they have the capacity to be able to build missile and have in the technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this as i said earlier would be very destabilizing i think to not only to the region, but to the international security environment. so who's helping them and my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time, in such a short perio
, a bloomberg government former members of both parties said negotiators should be able to reach an agreement. in an hour, president obama speaks to ceo's at the business roundtable, followed by news conferences with house speaker john boehner and minority leader nancy pelosi. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of six-three, i believe, and they will say that is precedent. indiana had a voter i.d. -- >> they decided on the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish id they did not say all of that was subsequently -- >> they talked about indiana. you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people voter i.d. loss disproportionately affect minorities -- implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. as -- if white americans can get id to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left.
's middle class. so i think it all is positive sentiments. the government is pumping more money, drive the infrastructure development. and i think that in the medium term over say the next couple months, the losses should be much better. >> all right. andrew, thank you. stick around. we'll come back to you you and talk more about the luxury sector. nick has views, as well, on the chinese stock market. speaking to cnbc a day after delivering his autumn statement in parliament, he said the budget plan would continue to attract investment to the british dealt markets. >> we have to get a control on spending. that's why i'm operating benefits by less than the rates of inflation. it's forecast to continue to fall, so we are making progress. britain started with a large deficit, but we're getting it down. >> you've drawn criticism about the lack of supporting growth. when will we see measures that booth the long term growth of the economy. >> i think you see two sorts of measures. big structural reforms to education and welfare, but also yesterday changes to our tax regime. so we now have on
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
secretary of the treasury, alexander hamilton, observe energy is a leading character in good government. the president must lead in a divided government and must not advocate his or her responsibility. president obama has the responsibility to propose a real bipartisan plan to avert the fiscal cliff that can pass both the house and the senate. withdrawing from the recommendations of the simpson- bowles commission, the president could propose a plan that would not only avert the so-called fiscal cliff, but also help us avert the fiscal abyss. if president obama were to offer such a plan, republicans would act favorably. going over the cliff is unnecessary. as it has been observed in "the wall street journal," the president is boxing in the republicans. he is offering them a deal they cannot accept. first, the president has repeatedly called for a balanced solution involving both revenue and less spending. what is obvious to the most casual observer is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar
-tax movement. his goal, to take big government and, in his words, drown it in the bathtub. norquist's weapon is the taxpayer protection pledge, which was at one point signed by 95% of gop members of congress. >> can you raise your hand if you feel so strongly about not raising taxes? >> on the campaign trail this year, only one republican presidential candidate, jon huntsman, dared to cross him. norquist has clout. he's called the most powerful unelected man in america today. >> he signed a pledge, it's without congress. >> that pledge is for that congress. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. >> republicans are jumping ship and supporting unspecified r revenue hikes to help cut the deficit. and big business resigned to higher taxes. here is lloyd blankfein. >> we had to lift up the marginal rate. >> norquist's response? >> some of these people have had impure thoughts. no one pulled the trigger and voted for a tax increase. >> to be sure, norquist is still raking in big bucks. according to open secrets.org, he shelled out almost $14 million to defeat democratic opponents in this past electio
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
just government, and too much of it. here he is in a clip from the 2006 documentary "1%." >> in the end we'd end up worse off. it would do harm not good. people don't pay those high taxes, they find ways of getting around it. you're never going to be able to stop them from finding ways to get around it. jenna: talking a little bit about taxes there. my next guest has written extensively about milton freidman. we wanted to ask him, what would milton do, one of the greatest economists. nobel peace prize winning economist. we have the author of the inch dense pensable milton freidman. what would he think about all of this. >> great to be with you. i'm sure if milton freidman were here today, he'd say go over the fiscal cliff. jenna: straight over it? don't even press on the brakes. >> it's always worthwhile to meet and have negotiations. at the end ever the day he favored the least government spending possible. i believe he would have said that is a course that isn't going to be accomplished by raising taxes, rather by raising taxes that will provide funding for more government spending. f
the "heavy hand of government" ... i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really? you're going to lay people off because now the government is going to help you fund your healthcare. really? i want to have those conversations, not to be confrontational, but to understand what the other side is saying, and i'd like to arm our viewers with the ability to argue with their conservative uncle joe over the dinner table. >>i jump out of my skin at people when i'm upset. do you share the sense of outrage that they're doing this, this corruption based on corruption based on corruption. >>i think that's an understatement, eliot. u>> i'm not prone tot. understatement, so explain to me why that is. i think the mob learned from wall st., not vice versa. >> there are so many unintended consequences. and for a country that's been at civil war for 4.5 decades our drug policy has been causing a lot of these peasant farmers to become alienated from the state. >> the sacrifice colombia does from fighting drugs is inordinate. the social damage is terrible. and most of the time destroyi
government if it is not paid out? once you open up a claim, just because you have got to clean open, you have $4,000 in your account -- massachusetts, you might have $15,000 in your account. that money, if you do not dried out, the state keeps it, i believe. -- draw it out, the state keeps it, i believe. guest: i am not sure how that would be handled. the difference between what is happening in the state fund, which is state-funded, and the federal reimbursement, i believe the federal reimbursement only goes to the states after they pick up the money. guest: that is my understanding as well. i did nothing states are able to keep money that is not disbursed to the unemployment. -- do not think states are able to keep money that is not disbursed to the unemploymed. -- unemployed. host: for you, mr. tanner, who is better at running these programs, the state governments or federal governments? guest: states have very different economic climates. what is going on the dakotas right now, they're not even eligible for this emergency unemployment extended benefits, versus new york, which has the highe
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